blackrabbit
blackrabbit New Reader
9/19/10 10:13 p.m.

as promised, here are a few pics from our local british car show. including my little german invader .... there were several hundred cars this year! excellent show... conclave, der Trabi !! by blackrabbitracing, on Flickr conclave D types by blackrabbitracing, on Flickr conclave, TR2 w/great patina by blackrabbitracing, on Flickr conclave MG ex186 by blackrabbitracing, on Flickr conclave MG ex 186 by blackrabbitracing, on Flickr conclave Sprites by blackrabbitracing, on Flickr conclave, Marcos by blackrabbitracing, on Flickr coclave, Elva/bmw by blackrabbitracing, on Flickr

aeronca65t
aeronca65t Dork
9/20/10 5:18 a.m.

Wow! Very nice!

Hard to believe they had EX186 there. Were those D-types real or replicas?

Tom Heath
Tom Heath Webmaster
9/20/10 9:56 a.m.

That looks like a great show. Wish I could have been there!

marcosv6
marcosv6 New Reader
9/21/10 2:46 p.m.

Nice to see the two Marcos. Hardly ever see one, let alone two at the same time!

Jagmeister
Jagmeister None
9/21/10 10:39 p.m.

In reply to aeronca65t:

This topic came up at our Jag Club meeting this evening. I was told they were replicas.

john5756
john5756
9/23/10 12:21 p.m.

In reply to aeronca65t:

The D types were fakes but they weren't admitting it. There was no indication they were not the real thing. One even had a genuine Jaguar ID plate but the VIN was obviously from the donor car and did not correspond to a D type VIN.

WilD
WilD HalfDork
9/23/10 1:25 p.m.
john5756 wrote: In reply to aeronca65t: The D types were fakes but they weren't admitting it. There was no indication they were not the real thing. One even had a genuine Jaguar ID plate but the VIN was obviously from the donor car and did not correspond to a D type VIN.

Yuck. I've come to expect that virtually evey Shelby Mustang, AAR Cuda, or whatever else might be rare is fake at car shows. I didn't know the disease has spread to brittish cars.

john5756
john5756 New Reader
9/23/10 2:06 p.m.

In reply to Jagmeister:

I've nothing against replicas as long as they are labeled as such. Both were excellent copies and as we all know real ones cost $2 - 3 million. One even sported the license plate 774 RW which currently belongs to the real D type VIN XKD505 which was the 1955 Le Mans winner. The same plate was also used on the 1953 Le Mans winner which was a C type. UK license plates with red letters are "trade plates' similar to dealer plates here in that they are transferable between vehicles. Jaguar could never afford a transporter in the 1950's so had to drive their racing cars to races on public roads hence the need for plates. I thoght it a bit presumptuous to attach this one to a replica but I guess there's a Walter Mitty in all of us.

Jagmeister
Jagmeister New Reader
9/23/10 10:08 p.m.

Here are a couple more photos:

Heinrick1985
Heinrick1985 New Reader
9/25/10 10:42 p.m.

Where was this?

john5756
john5756 New Reader
9/26/10 3:58 p.m.

In reply to Heinrick1985: Oak Park Arvada Colorado,

john5756
john5756 New Reader
9/26/10 4:01 p.m.

In reply to Jagmeister:

Did anyone get a photo of the Frazer nash Le Mans? It was the drab green car next to the red Allard. There are only 8 in the World, 2 in the US.

blackrabbit
blackrabbit New Reader
9/27/10 12:58 p.m.

In reply to john5756:

I took two shots of the frazer, unfortunatley they didnt come out well. one blurry??? and some one stepped in on the other... that is a very cool and rare car!!! lovely to see the little bristol engine in it...

Spanners
Spanners
12/1/10 11:30 p.m.
john5756 wrote: In reply to Jagmeister: Jaguar could never afford a transporter in the 1950's so had to drive their racing cars to races on public roads hence the need for plates. I thought it a bit presumptuous to attach this one to a replica but I guess there's a Walter Mitty in all of us.

Not exactly John, Jaguar could very much have afforded a transporter in the 1950's, in fact the factory flew the D's to France in later years. The whole intention behind the road registrations pasted to the cars (both the C's and the D's, the earliest D's wore different Coventry plates for reference) was active public promotion of the cars, i.e. Lyons wanted the cars viewed by the public going to Le Mans (and others), cleaning house, and then seen driven back to Coventry under their own power (where and when available of course - and blown-up be not). Also keep in mind that the orders for the Mark cars were coming in steadily (business was good) and their strategy was (as I understand it) not to build a gluttony of cars, but rather cater the inventory to an "as sold" basis. Malcolm Sayers even had a wind tunnel built at the factory to develop and design the D - point of interest. There are written references to the fact that the by-product of driving the cars to the races did save the factory money although..

Lyons (as you may recall) was a master promoter, a genius at many levels and took the "export or die" necessity to a fantastic outcome.

Not trying to bust chops, merely just clarifying.

Cheers

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