lnlogauge
lnlogauge HalfDork
11/25/22 4:12 p.m.

working on getting my wife's 2005 sequoia fixed up/cleaned up. The interior is in decent condition, but the front seats not so much. Is there any save for these that would improve the looks without the $$$ cost of replacement?

 

02Pilot
02Pilot PowerDork
11/25/22 4:36 p.m.

I saw this a while back and was intrigued:

 

That said, I haven't tried it, but the front seats in my Volvo V50 look about the same as the ones in your pic, and I have been tempted; just haven't had time to do it.

Failing that or something similarly easy, I'd probably just look at new leather from Lseat.

03Panther
03Panther PowerDork
11/25/22 5:12 p.m.

The price at Lseat looks good, if I ever get my head above water again! By then I'll need them for the highlander and the F350. 
Has anyone used them? Feedback? Thanks. 

wheelsmithy (Joe-with-an-L)
wheelsmithy (Joe-with-an-L) PowerDork
11/25/22 5:17 p.m.

I used some stuff called Leather Honey that didn't work miracles, but did make the leather more supple, and prevent further deterioration.

02Pilot
02Pilot PowerDork
11/25/22 6:25 p.m.

In reply to 03Panther :

I heard about them on this forum, and everything seemed to suggest they were the real deal, but I have not had occasion to use them myself.

MadScientistMatt
MadScientistMatt UltimaDork
11/25/22 6:53 p.m.

There are two options: Fill the cracks with color matched synthetic rubber, or cut out the damaged portion and sew in a new one. The color matched synthetic rubber approach generally isn't 100% color matched and is not nearly as durable; I'd go with a slip on seat cover over that sort of "repair".

Wicked93gs
Wicked93gs Reader
11/25/22 11:00 p.m.
03Panther said:

The price at Lseat looks good, if I ever get my head above water again! By then I'll need them for the highlander and the F350. 
Has anyone used them? Feedback? Thanks. 

I have used them, this is the Capri driver seat after I got done re-upholstering it:

Good quality upholstery....took forever to get the covers, but part of that was caused by the fact I sent the old covers and they made a new pattern

crankwalk (Forum Supporter)
crankwalk (Forum Supporter) UltraDork
11/26/22 12:14 a.m.
MadScientistMatt said:

There are two options: Fill the cracks with color matched synthetic rubber, or cut out the damaged portion and sew in a new one. The color matched synthetic rubber approach generally isn't 100% color matched and is not nearly as durable; I'd go with a slip on seat cover over that sort of "repair".

I had the synthetic liquid stuff then a dye over it for $180. 

 

I could see it probably isn't as durable for a DD for another 10 years or something but I'm sure it would be an improvement for quite a while. 

grover
grover Dork
11/26/22 12:42 a.m.

I used Lseat on my Range Rover classic.

 

As I recall, I got half off for sending my old covers in so they could make a pattern.  Took a while to get new covers. If they have the pattern in stock it should be faster.
 

I was impressed with the quality but the color did not match the rear seats exactly. 
I need to do my 2008 sequoia and will probably do lseat again. 

stuart in mn
stuart in mn MegaDork
11/26/22 7:48 a.m.

Leatherique is often recommended by guys in old BMW circles. http://www.leatherique.com

Caperix
Caperix Reader
11/26/22 7:56 a.m.

I've heard good things about fibernew for crack repair. I do not know what process they use for filling & dying though.  I am leaning towards trying lseat myself for some e46 sport seat covers, I just wish they would do heated leather.

wspohn
wspohn SuperDork
11/26/22 11:44 a.m.

British leather seats were almost all surface dyed and thus show surface cracking with age.

Try this - it works.  Did a large Jag with it.

https://www.woolies-trim.co.uk/p-1032-no-1-leather-renovation-kit

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