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Toyman!
Toyman! MegaDork
6/24/22 10:07 a.m.

My ex-business partner has decided to part with one of his Mustangs. Last year he bought a Boss 302 car and he's looking to sell his 65 Fastback.

I've been in the market for a 60s-era car. I've mostly been shopping early 60s Falcons but a Mustang would check most of the boxes and be something I could get parts for. 

The car in question is a 1965 Fastback. Original 289 car. He has replaced the floor pans, front fenders, hood, and trunk lid due to rust. I would not be going back original so original sheet metal means nothing to me. I would be turning it into a resto-mod cruiser and occasional track car. Modern suspension, fat tires, A/C, all the stuff that makes a car usable in the south and at the occasional track day.

There is some filler in the lower rear quarters and some rust in the bottoms of the doors but not what I would call excessive. 

The engine in the car has new heads and a refreshed bottom end and has been run but that's about the time he bought the Boss and lost interest. It also comes with a complete running engine on a stand that probably needs a refresh. 

Realistically I could have it running and driving in a couple of days. 

Pictures. 

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Both carbs are new.

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Values on these are all over the place. He's wanting about $15k for it. 

So do I want a Mustang project or would I rather buy a less desirable car that is complete? 

 

alfadriver
alfadriver MegaDork
6/24/22 10:14 a.m.

Is there any way to drive it?  

And I'm not meaning to get to know the condition, but to see if you really like the experience.  The good thing is that this is just a Falcon with a different body (I'll let you decide if it's better or worse).

The engine seems cool and all, but depending on what you want to do with it, it may be over carbed.  That kind of set up is great when you want max air flow, but could be tough to set up when you just want to drive around.

In terms of the rust- hopefully Tim will check in about replacing stuff.  For your sake, I hope it's available and easy- as that seems to be a decent opportunity.

Robbie (Forum Supporter)
Robbie (Forum Supporter) MegaDork
6/24/22 10:19 a.m.

I don't think you're likely to lose on a 65 fastback at 15k, but I agree you need to want the driving experience. 

Mr_Asa
Mr_Asa PowerDork
6/24/22 10:26 a.m.

It really depends on if you want a Mustang, and if this type of build is the Mustang you want.  

You can buy a Mustang shell made of brand new steel for about $20k and then build it however you want.  The parts houses have 95% of what you will need to build the rest from the bare shell.

This would save a decent amount over that, but is it setup how you would want?  Do you want to do stuff that would significantly modify the body? Major suspension or underhood mods?

Like Robbie said, at that price point I don't think it will hurt you to buy it.  With some (hopefully) light work it should just climb in value.  So you just need to ask yourself "do you want a Mustang?"

Toyman!
Toyman! MegaDork
6/24/22 10:28 a.m.

In reply to alfadriver :

It's definitely over carbed for what I will be doing. There is an almost 100% chance it ends up EFI eventually.

The suspension won't stay stock either. 

I'm not trying to stay in a class. I just want something easy and fun to work on that is fun to drive as well. 

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
6/24/22 10:31 a.m.

I hear that all the cool kids have one–even we do

ShawnG
ShawnG MegaDork
6/24/22 10:37 a.m.

Have you ever driven one?

If you can mooch a ride in one, drive it for a while and see if you really like it before you sink your money into it.

They really are terrible cars, I've restored a couple 60s Mustangs and driven plenty, they're not well built machines and have always been a disappointment.

It's a personal thing, I just don't like them. 

Be sure its what you want before you send a pile of money on it.

Appleseed
Appleseed MegaDork
6/24/22 10:39 a.m.

You will never loose on a fastback. If you ended up hating it, you could turn around and sell it for exactly what you paid. Everybody and their Grandma makes restoration parts. Everybody and their Grandma makes upgrades.

Plus you know the previous owner. That takes half the fear out of it because you don't have to play automotive detective and figure out what's wonky.

 

Stampie
Stampie MegaDork
6/24/22 10:39 a.m.

Yes

Pete. (l33t FS)
Pete. (l33t FS) MegaDork
6/24/22 10:41 a.m.

That isn't both carbs, that is three carbs smiley

When they work they work great.  They drive like having a Quadrajet, small primary carb and then the end carbs open up.

Practically speaking, you can get more power and better drivability with a decent modern 4-barrel and intake.  Getting a decent single carb intake on a 289 is a little tricky because of how narrow the engine is, which is why I suspect Ford liked using three carbs.  (That and you get 50% more float bowl volume)

 

I spent some time driving a K-code '66.  The car felt great to me except for how the turn signal stalk and my left knee wanted to occupy the same space.  Annoying when driving and a potential hospital visit if the door got slammed shut before ensuring knee was out of the puncture zone.  Not a fast car but definitely a fun car.

frenchyd
frenchyd MegaDork
6/24/22 10:44 a.m.
alfadriver said:

Is there any way to drive it?  

And I'm not meaning to get to know the condition, but to see if you really like the experience.  The good thing is that this is just a Falcon with a different body (I'll let you decide if it's better or worse).

The engine seems cool and all, but depending on what you want to do with it, it may be over carbed.  That kind of set up is great when you want max air flow, but could be tough to set up when you just want to drive around.

In terms of the rust- hopefully Tim will check in about replacing stuff.  For your sake, I hope it's available and easy- as that seems to be a decent opportunity.

I don't understand wanting to drive it.   A person either wants a car or doesn't.  The driving experience  with a car that old won't tell you anything.  To make it reliable you'll need to fully pull it apart and make sure  everything is done properly. Because anything you don't personally check is going to ruin your experience.  

frenchyd
frenchyd MegaDork
6/24/22 10:49 a.m.
Toyman! said:

In reply to alfadriver :

It's definitely over carbed for what I will be doing. There is an almost 100% chance it ends up EFI eventually.

The suspension won't stay stock either. 

I'm not trying to stay in a class. I just want something easy and fun to work on that is fun to drive as well. 

Stay in a class if you can. Any money you spend to update it will be wasted if and when you sell. 

wawazat
wawazat SuperDork
6/24/22 11:01 a.m.

Buy it at $15k is my advice.  Fastbacks will always have a market for resale if you don't like it.  Tri-power intake and carbs would probably be a quick flip.  Parts available everywhere-National Parts Depot (NPD), Summit, Jegs, Street or Track, Open Tracker Racing, Global West, TCI, Mike Maier, etc.   As noted they were cheaply built cars that are now old and not so cheap but ready for any kind of mods you want.  As an old Cougar owner I say buy it.

alfadriver
alfadriver MegaDork
6/24/22 11:41 a.m.
frenchyd said:
 

I don't understand wanting to drive it.   A person either wants a car or doesn't.  The driving experience  with a car that old won't tell you anything.  To make it reliable you'll need to fully pull it apart and make sure  everything is done properly. Because anything you don't personally check is going to ruin your experience.  

Are you kidding?  Knowing that you will enjoy the experience will go a long way in enjoying a car as opposed to never driving it because you hate driving it.  Too many people buy cars because they think they like them only to hate driving them- ending with them spending many years sitting still somewhere.  

Driving a car *that* old will tell you everything you need to know.  These are SO far removed from modern cars, it's not even funny.  And they are SO different from other cars in the same era, it's not even funny.

How can you not know that?

alfadriver
alfadriver MegaDork
6/24/22 11:43 a.m.
Toyman! said:

In reply to alfadriver :

It's definitely over carbed for what I will be doing. There is an almost 100% chance it ends up EFI eventually.

The suspension won't stay stock either. 

I'm not trying to stay in a class. I just want something easy and fun to work on that is fun to drive as well. 

I wasn't even thinking about racing- just how you want to drive it.  IMHO, the most important thing about old cars is that you like them enough to drive them often.  And if you take it to a driving event every once in a while, bonus.  A car this old isn't going to be competitive in any class unless it's literally not drivable on the street.

californiamilleghia
californiamilleghia UltraDork
6/24/22 11:43 a.m.

I love the look of a 65 fastback , 

would  be nice to put in a late Ford motor/ trans that gets 25-30 mpg ,

at 15k seems like a good deal

Datsun310Guy
Datsun310Guy MegaDork
6/24/22 11:58 a.m.

Yes

Cactus
Cactus HalfDork
6/24/22 1:39 p.m.

In reply to frenchyd :

Always drive before you buy. I thought I really wanted an E30 M3, then I took one for a spin and it was "meh, nothing special". 

 

That said, I'd have the cash in hand when driving the mustang. I don't see any reason it wouldn't be a ton of fun, and I've never driven a stock 65.

Toyman!
Toyman! MegaDork
6/24/22 2:23 p.m.

I've bought at least half of the cars I have ever owned without driving them, including SanFord. 

Driving experience is pretty subjective and I really love old and simple things. It can't drive any worse than my 57 Chevy did and tinkering with it to make it better will be half the fun. 

 

stan
stan UltraDork
6/24/22 2:32 p.m.
Robbie (Forum Supporter) said:

I don't think you're likely to lose on a 65 fastback at 15k, but I agree you need to want the driving experience. 

 This. At 15K, it's a great deal.

Brett_Murphy (Agent of Chaos)
Brett_Murphy (Agent of Chaos) MegaDork
6/24/22 3:00 p.m.

Everybody wants a 65 fastback Mustang, don't they?

aircooled
aircooled MegaDork
6/24/22 3:52 p.m.

I would think it would be pretty hard to loose money on it unless there is something horrible hidden there.

The nice thing about old Mustangs is there is a CRAP load of ways and parts to upgrade it to almost modern standards (safety wise though, not as much).  Modifying a Mustang does not seem to hurt it's value either (unless it was some super original car), there are lots out there.

I drove a stock 60's Mustang once and after driving over an expansion crack on a curved freeway ramp I though the rear end was falling out (leaf springs!).  I am very used to driving 60's cars, but mine are all fully independent suspensions cheeky

ShawnG
ShawnG MegaDork
6/24/22 4:05 p.m.

We had a customer who had a TR6 in high-school.

He's now in his late 50s and wanted another one.

We found him a nice TR6, checked it over and sent him for a test drive.

Moment of clarity later, he realised that they really aren't great cars for driving around unless you're actually looking for that sort of experience, got in his Audi TT and drove home.

I thought I would love an E-type. We got one a series 2 convertible in the shop. Dream was over. They're cramped, uncomfortable and slow. The Healey 3000 BJ8 is better.

benzbaronDaryn
benzbaronDaryn SuperDork
6/24/22 4:49 p.m.

If you wanted it you woulda already bought it.  They are cool but to associate with mustang bro is a turn off to me.

 

  What's cool about that car is it is a blank canvas, it will never be original so you can have fun with it, especially with the parts availability.    

buzzboy
buzzboy SuperDork
6/24/22 5:00 p.m.

1 too few pedals for a 65 Mustang

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