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Curmudgeon
Curmudgeon SuperDork
3/20/11 7:30 a.m.

My car had adjustable seat height and at its lowest setting I still couldn't sit up straight. It put my legs at a weird angle for the pedals too. Maybe I'm just not assembled properly. (goes looking for owner's manual)

neckromacr
neckromacr Reader
3/20/11 2:07 p.m.

In all fairness, you have to be assembled pretty oddly to properly fit in a Scirocco. I've been to the Scirocco owners get together, I know.

My future plans Include an OMP Corsica wheel, I finally found a seating position thats suits the rest of me, but my arms stretch all the way out. I also added Corrado seats because they sit about another 1/2-1" lower when bottomed out. Pretty nice seats seat bolstering too.

Joe Gearin
Joe Gearin Associate Publisher
3/22/11 1:25 p.m.

hmmm

I must be oddly proportioned, because I was always able to find a comfortable seating position in my 81, even with a helmet on. This was also in a sunroof car. The sunroof was a lift-out type though so it didn't intrude on headroom much.

Got the car home last night. Will post pics soon!

JBradleyFItzGer
JBradleyFItzGer
3/22/11 10:00 p.m.

In reply to Joe Gearin:

HI Joe!

I am glad you got her home safe and sound after you left my place. I can wait to see her complete. I will hold off beating you to posting pics lol. That was my little Unicorn.

Anyways I am glad she has found a loving home!

Brad

amg_rx7
amg_rx7 HalfDork
3/22/11 10:33 p.m.
sachilles wrote: One of my club mates unicorn. Should also be in the box flare thread. He picked it up from the original owner/creator last fall. It looks darn sexy with the correct rims on it.

More pics and details of this or ban

Mental
Mental SuperDork
3/23/11 2:13 a.m.

I had a 79 my senior year in HS. Loved that car, ruined the day of a fellow senior and his presumed fast and brand new 89 Escort GT in it. I had never seen a piston engine that would rev that high.

However on a wet freeway entrance ramp I learned the operational definition of lift throttle oversteer. It was alo my first foray into front wheel drive.

fornetti14
fornetti14 HalfDork
3/23/11 5:40 a.m.

Excellent! I love the MK1 VW's - Scirocco's or Rabbits.

Joe Gearin
Joe Gearin Associate Publisher
3/23/11 9:40 a.m.

Ok, Ok, jeez, I'd hate to get banned from our own board!

Sorry it took so long to get the pics up. Cleaned out the car and took inventory last night. The more I examined, the happier I've become. Although the car needs a ton of work, it is a fantastic starting point. Thanks again to Tom Heath for busting his hump in helping me pick it up, and also to Brad for being upfront, honest, and great to deal with in buying the car! Also, welcome to the board Brad, I think you will like it here!

Nearly all the interior trim is accounted for, and in great shape. With a new headliner, it should be pretty nice. Now, what to do with the seats....

Super Sciroccos had a unique steering wheel, gladly this one is in great shape

Floors are mostly rust free

Driver's side will need a bit of repair

Carpet is in amazing shape, and gloriously orangeish!

switched to carb (WTF?)

Ratty original paint, but pretty straight and clean

sachilles
sachilles Dork
3/23/11 9:48 a.m.
amg_rx7 wrote:
sachilles wrote: One of my club mates unicorn. Should also be in the box flare thread. He picked it up from the original owner/creator last fall. It looks darn sexy with the correct rims on it.
More pics and details of this or ban

sccv project section link

Luke
Luke SuperDork
3/23/11 9:57 a.m.

That's a really cool steering wheel - thin, sporty, nice diameter. (I'm kind of a steering wheel aficionado.)

Rad car, too. Love the colour, and it looks like a great base for restoration. Looking forward to reading about it!

cxhb
cxhb HalfDork
3/23/11 10:49 a.m.
mad_machine wrote: I would love me a Mk 1 Scirocco.. one of the prettiest cars to ever come out of VAG

HA he said vag...

crowmill
crowmill
3/23/11 1:01 p.m.

Good luck with it and don't throw anything away. I have been restoring a 1976.5 for over two years.

1976superscirocco.blogspot.com/

frankenstangsghost
frankenstangsghost New Reader
3/23/11 1:26 p.m.

My brother had one of those back in the day. Cool car. It was Iceberg Blue (light silver/blue) with funky black and red Recaro seats, BBS wheels, etc. He drove it until a strut tower separated from the rest of the unibody. That was right around 300,000 miles or so.

Joe Gearin
Joe Gearin Associate Publisher
3/23/11 1:57 p.m.
crowmill wrote: Good luck with it and don't throw anything away. I have been restoring a 1976.5 for over two years. 1976superscirocco.blogspot.com/

Wow! crowmill, That is an amazing restoration you have undertaken. I actually learned a lot about the history of the car when I found your blog last week. Thanks for posting over here.

I noticed you have been keeping track of how many Super Sciroccos are out there. Any idea on how many were produced? I've heard 2000, but also 2500.

Thanks again for joining the GRM forum!

friedgreencorrado
friedgreencorrado SuperDork
3/24/11 2:15 a.m.
Joe Gearin wrote: switched to carb (WTF?)

Joe, that was the solution to erratic engine problems "back in the day". Easier to escape emissions testing (the laws had lower "too much money to pay" limits then), and none of us knew how to reprogram a chip for reliability..much less for the sake of performance.

Chips were alot more fragile in the dawn of modern (i.e., electronic) fuel injection. The vibration & heat meant they died young, and they often died instantly, leaving your 2-3yr old car dead by the side of the road. I still think that the reason chips live so long in modern electronic devices is because of the lessons the manufactureres learned by shoving them into cars all those years ago.

Anyhoo..buying a new ECU was outrageously expensive at the time, since the dealer was the only place you could get one (and the junkyards adjusted their prices accordingly). Normal gearhead reaction around the indie import shops/indie import parts store (which were the local message boards of the era) was to "..just tear that berkeleying E36M3 out, and put a berkeleying Weber on it!.."

And that sir..is why you have a carb on your motor. The thing that scares me it that it looks like an early watercooled VW Solex, instead of a Weber downdraft.

And again..the only reason I'm bitching this much is that I'm jealous.

Woody
Woody SuperDork
3/24/11 4:54 a.m.

I love this:

Type Q
Type Q Dork
3/24/11 8:03 a.m.
friedgreencorrado wrote: Joe, that was the solution to erratic engine problems "back in the day". Easier to escape emissions testing (the laws had lower "too much money to pay" limits then), and none of us knew how to reprogram a chip for reliability..much less for the sake of performance. Chips were alot more fragile in the dawn of *modern* (i.e., *electronic*) fuel injection. The vibration & heat meant they died young, and they often died instantly, leaving your 2-3yr old car dead by the side of the road. I still think that the reason chips live so long in modern electronic devices is *because* of the lessons the manufactureres learned by shoving them into cars all those years ago. Anyhoo..buying a new ECU was outrageously expensive at the time, since the dealer was the only place you could get one (and the junkyards adjusted their prices accordingly). Normal gearhead reaction around the indie import shops/indie import parts store (which *were* the local message boards of the era) was to "..just tear that berkeleying E36M3 out, and put a berkeleying Weber on it!.."

I thought the Bosch CIS system used in VW's and Porsche 911's of that era was mostly mechanical. Was something different used on this unicorn?

I must be getting older because I remember the era when "Carb conversions" were considered a cheap solution to drivability problems.

modernbeat
modernbeat HalfDork
3/24/11 8:53 a.m.
sachilles wrote: One of my club mates unicorn. Should also be in the box flare thread. He picked it up from the original owner/creator last fall. It looks darn sexy with the correct rims on it.

I love how he's got two cars sideways in a single bay.

16vCorey
16vCorey SuperDork
3/24/11 9:08 a.m.
Type Q wrote:
friedgreencorrado wrote: Joe, that was the solution to erratic engine problems "back in the day". Easier to escape emissions testing (the laws had lower "too much money to pay" limits then), and none of us knew how to reprogram a chip for reliability..much less for the sake of performance. Chips were alot more fragile in the dawn of *modern* (i.e., *electronic*) fuel injection. The vibration & heat meant they died young, and they often died instantly, leaving your 2-3yr old car dead by the side of the road. I still think that the reason chips live so long in modern electronic devices is *because* of the lessons the manufactureres learned by shoving them into cars all those years ago. Anyhoo..buying a new ECU was outrageously expensive at the time, since the dealer was the only place you could get one (and the junkyards adjusted their prices accordingly). Normal gearhead reaction around the indie import shops/indie import parts store (which *were* the local message boards of the era) was to "..just tear that berkeleying E36M3 out, and put a berkeleying Weber on it!.."
I thought the Bosch CIS system used in VW's and Porsche 911's of that era was mostly mechanical. Was something different used on this unicorn? I must be getting older because I remember the era when "Carb conversions" were considered a cheap solution to drivability problems.

They were. The only think electric on them was the cold start valve and the frequency valve (that enriched/leaned based on O2 reading). Wait, I think these were pre-O2 sensor, so there wasn't much electronic at all. I don't think they even had a computer. That being said, CIS is super freakin' reliable, but when they do have issues, most people don't know how to deal with them. "Just throw a dad-gummed carb on it, Jimbo!"

jrw1621
jrw1621 SuperDork
3/24/11 9:21 a.m.

Well done on lifting the ban of yourself.
Thanks for the pics.
I had not noticed the two cars are both in one bay. I need to measure that option at my own house for winter storage.

EricM
EricM Dork
3/24/11 9:40 a.m.

Zomg! I love cars, yours is a treat to look at.

friedgreencorrado
friedgreencorrado SuperDork
3/25/11 1:03 p.m.
Type Q wrote: I thought the Bosch CIS system used in VW's and Porsche 911's of that era was mostly mechanical. Was something different used on this unicorn? I must be getting older because I remember the era when "Carb conversions" were considered a cheap solution to drivability problems.

CIS (and CIS E, I don't remember which one the Mk1's had) had a lot of mechanical components, but yeah..they did have a basic ECU.

And don't sweat the age..I'm old enough to remember actually helping people do carb conversions..

EDIT: Genuflecting before Corey's superior knowledge..he's probably forgotten more about these cars than I ever knew in the first place!

Curmudgeon
Curmudgeon SuperDork
3/25/11 6:28 p.m.
Joe Gearin wrote:

I see you have the Everlast bag at the ready for taking out frustrations.

Back in da day, no one- and I mean NO ONE- understood FI, even systems as simple as CIS. If you took it to the dealerships, the guys would just start throwing parts at it, hoping they'd fix it. The manuals might as well have been written in Greek and turkey tracks to the average wrench turner of the era who'd grown up around carbs, points etc. They knew how to fix that stuff. So a LOT of FI systems got yanked and replaced with Webers etc., that's just how things were at the time.

But if you think CIS was hard for the average goober to understand, the manuals for those damn feedback carbs on GM and Ford products (along with the Chrysler 'Lean Burn' system) might as well have been written in Sanskrit. Cannon Induction made a ton off the import guys, Holley made their bucks off the 'drop on' replacement carbs for the domestics.

JohnW
JohnW Reader
3/25/11 7:36 p.m.

In reply to Joe Gearin: MK1 Sciroccos have a permanent place in my top-10 list and this car reminds me why. Great patina, great color. (Yeah, I like doo-doo brown.) The main thing I would want to do is dump that carb for an FI set-up of some sort.

ditchdigger
ditchdigger HalfDork
3/25/11 10:07 p.m.
Joe Gearin wrote: Super Sciroccos had a unique steering wheel, gladly this one is in great shape

That wheel isn't unique to super sciroccos. It is the standard '75 to mid 76 'rocco steering wheel. I have bought and sold 2 dozen of those things in the last 10 years. Even in rough shape if they have the horn button I was getting $150 a piece. I slapped a black on on ebay 2 years ago and the winning bid was $312 plus shipping to germany! They are very desireable. I myself don't care for the feel. Too skinny and way to large of a diameter but what I DO like in this pic is the early turn signal/wiper stalks. Take care of those things as they are unobtanium. Sadly they will not work with intermittent wipers like the later plastic ones do but honestly I think they might be worth the sacrifice.

Also note the 3 level HVAC controls. Another to mid 76 oddity that is shared with swallowtail rabbits.

Damnit I think I actually just gave away the correct factory AM radio with silver face plate to match that cluster.

Sorry I am a bit of a early A1 VW geek. Does the cigarette lighter have a zippo style lighter on it or a cigarette?

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